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Thank you, this is so helpful. πŸ™πŸ’• I thought covid had the ability to get into the central nervous system because of the loss of smell. I experienced this with omicron, it was very strange. But I didn't notice any change in my ability to taste, which may point to different, more central neural pathways for each of those different sensory capacities (taste and smell). It's helpful to know that the virus doesn't replicate much in the central nervous system.

I understanding is this vaccine injection contains up to a billion nanoparticles, and there are unfortunate people who randomly end up with a lot of nanoparticles and/or synthetic spike protein in their central nervous system.

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So the anosmia as well as brain fog appeared to add legs to the neuroinvasive nature- the olfactory bulb is rather thin with respect to the BBB so it would make sense, especially given that other viruses may pass into the CNS. However, I think a study came out last year which looked at autopsies of people and found that the olfactory bulb and corresponding neurons were not targeted. Instead, I believe it was cells involved with signaling to neurons, and so these cells were damaged and caused the loss of smell. It's been a while so I'll have to look back and see.

I'm trying to figure out the idea of the LNPs with respect to demyelination. That would be something that would appear somewhere in the literature given that LNPs have been attempted as a drug delivery system. However, the BBB is not easily assessible even by lipophilic molecules- things pass through via receptor binding and other mechanisms. Apparently some LNPs that act as drug delivery systems may attempt to utilize these receptors and may add certain things to help bypass the BBB. I believe they also try to introduce them intranasally to take advantage of the more permeable BBB in the nose as well, although I can't recall much of the specifics of these dynamics.

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Thanks for this comment. Interesting that it was probably the cells related to the olfactory bulb that were affected by this virus.

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I believe it was this study, although here they provide a summary. It's been a while since I looked at it so I'd have to spend time to see what it says.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/12/211206113042.htm

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I'd have to look again and see, but I believe there was some study that suggested that the nerves weren't directly targeted. If I find it I'll try to remember to link it. πŸ˜…

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Thanks! I'm glad to hear it, I was a little concerned about the virus entering my nervous system but after this and today's stack, I'm not anymore. πŸ™πŸ’•

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The persistent brain fog and symptoms of long COVID are still interesting. I'm curious if the persistent endothelial inflammation as proposed by Dr. Yoh and Dr. Patterson (I believe) really is what's causing everything. Neuroinflammation itself may cause neuronal damage, but again it's likely after longterm inflammation and rely on a host of other issues. I think the fact that direct neuronal damage doesn't appear to occur unless in severe illness (in which case you're likely in serious trouble anyways) should provide some clarity. But again, maybe we'll find some information that suggests otherwise. Life is full of obstacles and things that may harm us. If we spend all of our time worrying about what will kill us we won't spend time actually living.

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Mar 14, 2023Liked by Modern Discontent

That's such a brain full of research and info. Thank you every time!

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Thank you Paul! I try to include a lot of what I cite since I believe most people don't read the citations for themselves, so by presenting it hopefully they see it. But that ends up taking up more time that I and readers would want (these posts tend to go long already) so it seemed more appropriate to just lay them out and be easily accessible to everyone.

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